uGovernIT

A Practical Approach for IT Governance

Archive for December 2015

A Simple Scorecard for building a Healthy Project Culture in a Technology Centric Environment

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CultureIn a very useful HBR study that attempted to build a scorecard for assessing company culture,  Lindsay McGregor and Neel Doshi, argue that “Creating a business case for culture isn’t impossible. While it is difficult to measure whether someone is being creative, proactive, or resilient in the moment, it’s actually not difficult to calculate total motivation.”  They identify six factors: three encouraging (Play, Purpose, Potential) and three discouraging (Emotional, Economic and Inertia or Friction).  They go on to provide a simple score card for assessing the net cultural score (they call it ToMo) based on surveying the employees.  The specific factors they use or their scoring technique is not as relevant as the approach an organization should take.

Let us start by acknowledging that while there are literally thousands of articles and models for understanding and building organizational culture.  However, the harsh reality is that very few in the leadership team have the time to devote to building a corporate culture.  The approach presented here is simple and can be implemented with relatively less effort.  To credit the authors cited above, their technique bears some resemblance to the one I am presenting.  The methodology shared here is built into our IT Governance tool (uGovernIT).

To start, baseline the current state.  Identify measurements and set a weight for each measurement.  Note that measurements can be positive or negative.  For example, excess emphasis on technology cost may hamper the innovative culture of the organization.  For technology centric-companies,  typical positive measurements may be organizations ability to tolerate mistakes, organizations ability to promote from within, flexibility in work styles, etc.   Example of negative factors include emphasis on cost and not on value, emphasis on meeting schedules and and not on quality, emphasis on onerous processes, etc. Once these factors are identified and the measuring instruments chosen, the implementation typically involves a survey mechanism.

Many use the survey ranking from 1 to 5 or 1 to 7, but this may be a mistake.  As eloquently quoted by Mr. Ken Venner, CIO at SpaceX, the best technique is to use a 1 to 4 ranking forcing the responder to select an opinion.  The baseline score is readily computed using the weights associated.  Once the base line is established, then a specific set of expected targets are established.

The diagram above shows six measurements (three to enhance the positive focus and three to diminish the negative focus).  To achieve the expected state, let us assume that the organization works out a strategy, perhaps in conjunction with experts.  Once the strategies are implemented, and survey is again conducted to measure the actual state.  This process can continue as a normal aspect of organizational change.  Scorecards will help keep us honest.  Instead of giving lip service to a serious topic, the scorecard gives organizations the current state and helps them plan for a better state.  The very fact that a scorecard is created has the Heisenberg effect.  It shows that culture is important to the organization.

The simple technique illustrated above highlights that even small organizations can undertake the effort to improve culture.  A strong organization culture is a strong brand.  All of us in technology know the value of a strong brand.

Written by Subbu Murthy

December 2, 2015 at 6:46 am

A Lesson in Life from the CEO of Boston Celtics and the CEO of Boston RedSox

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Celtics and RedSoxAs a Lakers fan and a Dodger fan, I may have committed two cardinal sins that may not be condoned by southern californians. On a business trip to Boston, I was privileged to attend the Evanta CIO Executive Summit.  The key note was moderated by David Rudzinsky, SVP, Information Services & CIO at Hologic, Inc.  The two key note speakers were Wyc Grousbeck, Governor and CEO of Boston Celtics, and Larry Lucchino, CEO of Boston RedSox.

With CEOsUnlike “I did so and so, or you should do so and so” keynotes which is typical of CIO Events, this was different.  There was a just a panel discussion.  Neither Wyc nor Larry,  even remotely hinted about their stellar achievements.  They shared how technology had changed sports. Larry was articulating how analytics was helping the organization draw the balance between intuitive decision making and fact based decision making – scary to think how a former basketball player and baseball player is in tune with the technology trends. Wyc was talking about the role and influence technology had played in the Celtics organization. If you visit the Evanta site, you can read all about it.  I will only share two of the many insights they shared.  Wyc shared that streaming basketball games on mobile phones in China alone yielded NBA 280 million dollars in revenues last season. Larry shared that decades back, internet rights were given away by baseball owners to MLB leading to inequities between large markets such as Boston, LA or NY and smaller markets like Kansas City.

The punch line!

It was refreshing to hear these two and meet them afterwards.  But Wyc left us with a very impressive message.  When asked what advice they had for CIOs, Wyc said “All of you have achieved a lot in life.   You may want to start thinking about what your next banner will be.  In my case, I have a blind son, and while it was great to hold the Celtics banner in 2008, it will be nicer if I hold a banner for a social cause.

Written by Subbu Murthy

December 2, 2015 at 6:29 am